Celexa Generic Name: citalopram (si TAL o pram)

What is Celexa?

Celexa (citalopram) is an antidepressant in a group of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).

Celexa is used to treat depression.

Celexa may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information

You should not use Celexa if you also take pimozide, as the combination can cause problems with your heart rhythm.

Do not use Celexa if you have used a MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days (such as isocarboxazid, linezolid, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, or tranylcypromine) or have received a methylene blue injection. A fatal reaction may occur.

Some young people have thoughts about suicide when first taking an antidepressant. Stay alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor.

Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor, such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Do not give Celexa to anyone younger than 18 years old without the advice of a doctor. Citalopram is not approved for use in children.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use Celexa if you are allergic to citalopram or escitalopram (Lexapro), or if you also take pimozide.

Do not use Celexa if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur. MAO inhibitors include isocarboxazid, linezolid, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine, or methylene blue injection.

To make sure Celexa is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • a bleeding or blood clotting disorder;
  • liver or kidney disease;
  • narrow-angle glaucoma;
  • seizures or epilepsy;
  • heart disease, heart failure, a heart rhythm disorder, slow heartbeats, or recent history of heart attack;
  • personal or family history of Long QT syndrome;
  • an electrolyte imbalance (such as low levels of sodium, potassium or magnesium in your blood);
  • bipolar disorder (manic depression); or
  • a history of drug abuse or suicidal thoughts.

Some young people have thoughts about suicide when first taking an antidepressant. Your doctor should check your progress at regular visits. Your family or other caregivers should also be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms.

Taking an SSRI antidepressant during pregnancy may cause serious lung problems or other complications in the baby. However, you may have a relapse of depression if you stop taking your antidepressant. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant. Do not start or stop taking this medicine during pregnancy without your doctor’s advice.

Citalopram can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using Celexa.

Do not give Celexa to anyone under 18 years old without medical advice. Citalopram is not approved for use in children.